Camp 5 and the Lumberjack Steam Train

This past weekend our families got together in northern Wisconsin. It was a weekend of relaxation and fun at the lake. We spent some time out on the lake boating and swimming. My father-in-law, Dan, was the cook, and my father, Mitch, was the entertainment! It seems like whenever we visit the cottage we do some sort of history lesson. This time we paid a visit to the Camp 5 Logging Museum.

First off, I am a railroad fanatic. I have always been fascinated with the steam locomotives, so when we pulled up to the museum and an old steam locomotive was waiting by the station… I sort of lost it. I knew this was going to be a fun experience. You purchase your tickets at the ticket office in the old depot. The train takes you for a short ride over to the logging camp/farm. On our way out to the museum, the family piled into a vintage, wooden passenger car. With a few short blasts of the steam whistle, the train began to move down the track.

A few minutes later we arrived at Camp 5. What a neat little museum they have. There was a petting zoo, logging museum, blacksmith shop, general store, and a food shack. I was eager to learn some history about the logging industry in the area ( I had ancestors who were lumberjacks). They had a full spread of tools and equipment used by men in the camps, as well as some history of the company the camp was associated with. Molly was really excited to feed the animals at the petting zoo, so we spent $1 for a bag of oats to feed to the goats, donkey, and a calf.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When we were done at the museum the train came to take us back. I chose to sit in the observation car ( formerly a cattle car) right behind the locomotive. A conductor yelled, “All Aboard,” and we were on our way. The locomotive gave a few long blasts of the whistle and began to hiss and chug. The black smoke billowed from the stack as we roared down the track. The smell of the burning coal was distinct, and it made me wonder what industrial cities like Oshkosh and Milwaukee once smelled like with all the coal-burning factories and locomotives. Tiny particles of soot rained down on us for a few moments. I did not mind it all. I figured it was all part of the experience.

Finally, we arrived at the depot. As we disembarked from the train, one of the engineers asked a five or six-year-old boy if he would like to blow the steam whistle. He must have been shy, because he opted out. I wonder what the engineer thought when a stocky, twenty-four-year-old guy came running up and anxiously asked if he could blow the steam whistle ( I was just a little excited ). After posing for a picture with Molly, I made my way up to the cab of the locomotive, and Dad, who was just as excited, was right there to watch. I latched on to the cord and gave two long blasts and then two short blasts of the steam whistle.  It was better than I imagined it would be. Wow, I got to blow the whistle of a steam locomotive. I can cross that off of my bucket list.

10564916_10204704833087593_2037082246_n

Yours truly blowing the whistle

It was truly a fun day at Camp 5. If you are near Laona, Wisconsin, I would recommend it to anyone with small children. It is educational and hands on. Heck, I might even go back again someday for a chance to ride in the locomotive and blow the steam whistle again!

Faucet Fiasco

10481846_10204280574878182_1969802176091027647_n

Hello again to my blog followers! Sorry for my brief hiatus from blogging. Life has been super busy with Molly and I buying a house and moving. Now we are pretty much settled in and the work begins! There are so many things to tackle, but our first project is to fix our 1920s Crane shower faucet.

  Crane “Concorde” Shower Faucet (Bathroom Machineries)

This is a pre-war Crane “Concorde” shower valve. The shower handle is hard to turn and hot water was not coming out. My dad and I pulled everything apart to see what it looked like and try to fix it. Unfortunately, our attempt to fix the valve was futile. We bought some rubber washers hoping it would help, but it was not the right thickness to allow any water to flow. It’s been a bit of a hassle to locate info and parts on this model mixer valve. I found a place in Chicago called the Chicago Faucet Shoppe that carries the parts for this shower faucet.

I gave the company a call, but the news was not reassuring. Although I was able to get the parts I needed now, some of the parts were no longer available. I am afraid that if something else broke on it I would not be able fix it. Molly and I decided to just replace it with modern faucet. Yes, this was a hard decision for me to make. I loved this piece in our shower, but it is just not practical for us.

 

 

Oshkosh Luggage

Oshkosh Trunk

You never know the treasures you will run into each day. Last weekend I got my vintage stove that will be going in my new kitchen, and now this week I bought a suitcase made right here in Oshkosh. I was so stunned when I found a travel bag made in Oshkosh. So, once again, I had some history to discover.

The Oshkosh Trunk Company was started in 1902 and operated out of a factory on High St. The firm produced quality wardrobe trunks (exclusively). Its signature line of luggage called the “Chief” was styled with red and yellow striped canvas.  In 1927 the company began manufacturing smaller travel luggage. The Oshkosh Trunk Company was acquired by Plotkin Brothers, a Chicago firm, in 1939. The Plotkin Brothers owned several other luggage companies, and added Oshkosh Trunk Company to add quality luggage to its product line. After the merger the Oshkosh company’s name was changed to Oshkosh Trunk and Luggage Company. The company fell on hard times, and the Oshkosh factory was closed in 1961.

Oshkosh Trunk Company (Oshkosh Public Library)

Too bad my suitcase was not the “Chief” line with red and yellow stripes, but I can keep a lookout for one. The plan is to turn this piece of luggage into a craft box for my wife’s sewing and knitting supplies. Another interesting tidbit I found while doing this search was how the “Chief” is making a comeback in small handbags. Apparently someone was inspired by this high-quality line of luggage with the slogan that boasted, “There is none finer.”

 

Our New Old Stove

GE Kitchen

My wife and I are in the process of purchasing a home. The kitchen is decked out with steel cabinets, which is really retro but awesome! When we went and toured the home I noticed that the modern electric range had some significant gaps between the cabinets on each side. The realtor explained that the old stove had been removed by previous owners. I never really gave it any thought. I looked up some old kitchen appliance brochures, just to see what late 1940s early 1950s kitchens looked like.  I showed my wife and said it would have been sort of neat to have the original stove in the kitchen. Well, good things come to those who wait.

While visiting my in-laws in Milwaukee I acquired one of these vintage stoves by chance. My father-in-law’s friend was also visiting from Portland; he used to live in Milwaukee. We told him about our new house and the vintage kitchen. He told me that the house he wants to sell has an old GE stove in it and we could have it. Sometimes I cannot believe how these opportunities come along. We went over and checked it all over, and the stove is absolutely amazing.

The only mystery I had to solve was the year and model name of this range. I had a category number (C-32) and serial number(7888101) that I found in the oven. One would think that a Google search would muster some answers. This was not an easy task! I found other models of GE ranges but nothing that matched this model. I sort of put this quest on the back burner, but tonight I found my answer! I asked myself, who would know more about GE appliances than GE!? I gave the GE hotline a ring (1-800-626-2005) and asked the customer service representative. I am sure not too many people are calling up this hotline asking about info on ancient appliances. Nonetheless, she was able to tell me that my electric stove was from 1950. She was not able to find out what the name of the model was (Stratoliner, Liberator, Airliner, etc). The search went on!

0cc13f4c945242f89bb0729a3f9a5b64_crop

With very little information available, I decided to go through Newspaperarchive.com and find some answers. I narrowed my years to 1950, and I did a search for “GE Electric Range” in all newspapers. I finally got the results I was looking for. It turns out this model is the GE “Astroliner” electric range. There was no indication of that on the unit itself, but the advertisement I found matches the appearance of our range and the model C-32 I found in the oven door.

I cannot wait to get this oven in our new house once we move in! It will be one step closer to being the original retro kitchen. Maybe a retro refrigerator will be installed one day. How many of my readers remember having or still have one of these old units? What brand do you use?

AC Biographies

I am in contact with a gentleman from Milwaukee who is going to help me gather the stories of former Allis-Chalmers employees. He takes his father, a former AC employee, to a monthly gathering of these AC retirees. He said that a lot of these guys are getting up there in age, and I would like to collect as many stories as I can. I am asking any former employees of AC to fill out the form below. I also encourage family members of former workers to fill the form out as well.

Day in Appleton

My wife and I decided to hit the road this weekend and take a trip to Appleton. It’s only about a 20-25 minute drive up the road, so we just went for it. I made a deal with Molly, I told her that if we could go to the History Museum at the Castle that I would take her shopping. We actually spent more time shopping than at the museum, but we were both content in the end. 

Before you go on a history/shopping adventure it is important to eat a good meal. We always wanted to go to the Appleton Beer Factory to try out their brews and food. I tried their Hefeweizen  (hay-fuh-veyt-sssenn) and a mac n cheese sandwich, and Molly ordered the Blonde Ale with a BBQ pulled pork sandwich. Everything was very delicious, and I plan to bring my father-in-law back to this awesome brewpub. 

0426123141

After the brewpub we made our way over to the museum. I was there many years ago, but there is a fun exhibition  called Food  going on now. There is also a floor dedicated to the history of Harry Houdini and his legacy as an escape artist. In the basement you get a glimpse of Appleton’s paper industry, the city’s historical timeline, and recreations of businesses ( bank, doctor’s office, gas station). There was even a little corner about Senator Joseph McCarthy.

I have to say that I was really impressed with the  exhibition about food. I enjoyed all the different elements and visuals used in it. I also liked the ways that the museum incorporated social media into the panels. This was the first time I saw a panel with twitter hashtags to engage discussion. There was a question, depending on the topic, and then you could tweet a response to it on the museum’s hashtag (#MyHistoryMuseum). Another great technique used to get school children involved was asking a question and supplying sticky notes for responses on the panels. Another involved telling a story of opposing views and asking them to make a choice of who they sided. The choice was made by placing a token in a container next to the options.

It was a fun-filled day of beer, history, and shopping. It was great to get back to that museum to see the exhibition and the information they had to share. Have you been to the museum to see Food? What did you think of it and what did you learn?