Allis-Chalmers Farm Commando

Farm Commando

In 1942-43 Allis-Chalmers Mfg Co. launched its Farm Commando program.  Two-day mechanical training courses were conducted by local A-C dealerships. The classes were meant to help farmers and mechanics learn the basics of caring for tractors, All-Crop combines, and implements. The classes were a war-effort plan to boost food production and help the Allies win the war.

"Farm Commando" school

“Farm Commando” school

In addition to teaching basic maintenance, the program also encouraged farmers to take their equipment to dealers to be checked over. Allis-Chalmers attempted to divert raw materials and man power from farm equipment to build weapons of war, so farmers keeping their older tractors running was important.

"Farm Commando-Gram"

“Farm Commando-Gram”

Upon completing the Farm Commando school or having an older tractor checked and fixed, equipment owners received the red, white, and blue Farm Commando sticker to place on their farm machinery. It was meant to be a symbol of pride that the farmer had done their part for the war effort. It was an approach to keep the agriculture sector of the United States running efficiently. The less time farm equipment was down for repairs, the more grains and other agriculture products could be produced for the Allies.

Decal placed on farm equipment checked over.

Decal placed on farm equipment that was “Ready to Roll”

Do you have a piece of Allis-Chalmers farm machinery with a Farm Commando decal on it? Do you remember  the Farm Commando Program from the 1940s? Share your experience by commenting on this post.

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2 comments on “Allis-Chalmers Farm Commando

  1. Seems I am always learning something from your postings. Thanks so much.

  2. Bill Long says:

    Austin is a member of the Unofficial Allis Chalmers internet forum and we communicate from time to time. Since I lived through WWII and my father was an Allis Chalmers dealer it was my job to apply the Farm Commando Decals to the units that had come through our shop for maintenance. Pop paid me to. Fifteen cents an hour. Had to keep my own time records too.
    However, it was important. I have never seen the country so united for one purpose. We all know we had to WIN THE WAR. We all did our part. This was one of mine along with putting cleats on the steel wheeled tractors we were required to sell since we could not get rubber, stock parts, sell parts, and even sell and service equipment. Made me feel good. after all I was “fitin” the war
    Good Luck!
    Bill Long

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