Our Adventure in Manitowoc

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Molly and I have been suffering from cabin fever like most Wisconsinites this time of year. We decided to hit the road and travel to Manitowoc for some fun. Molly wanted to check out a new yarn store that just opened, and I wanted to visit the Wisconsin Maritime Museum  along the lakeshore.

We planned our trip just at the right time. Manitowoc was celebrating Ice on 8th (8th Street is the main commercial district.) Locals came out and carved ice sculptures all along the sidewalks. There were also a few other activities planned during the festival. We explored the stores and even bought a few souvenirs. We had to stop a local coffee shop for some warm drinks–the air was nippy that day!

After our adventure of shopping, we headed down 8th Street to the Courthouse Pub across the street from the county courthouse. It was a super-sweet little brewpub! I ordered some of their craft beer and it was refreshing! If you go for lunch, Molly and I recommend ordering their delicious Judge’s Burger. They serve some great food and drinks in a fun setting.

After lunch, we headed down to the Wisconsin Maritime Museum. We got there just in time to take a tour of the submarine USS Cobia. The Cobia is a Gato-class submarine built during World War II. While the Cobia was not built in Manitowoc, it is similar to 28 other Gato-class submarines built at the local shipyard.  The Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company employed some 7,000 people during the war to build these vessels. Upon completion, the submarines were tested in Lake Michigan and then were taken down to the Gulf of Mexico on barges in the cover of night.

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I think Molly really enjoyed the tour. It was something different for her–this was my third time in the submarine.  We headed back in the museum to see the rest of the exhibits. They had model boats, a triple expansion steam engine, and a great collection of sail and motor boats.

What I enjoy the most is when the stories of the men and women are brought to life. Before walking into the USS Cobia exhibit, there were little postcards that had a picture, name, background, and a story about a sailor that served on the vessel. It’s great when the personal stories tied in with the artifact.  You can go into this ship and learn all about the mechanics and specs of the ship. But it is the stories of the young men that risked their lives in these vessels to serve their country that makes it an interesting and lasting history. If it was not for them the ship would just be a floating piece of metal.

Have you visited the USS Cobia? What were your impressions? What did you think of the rest of the exhibits?